What Happens After DukeEngage?

DukeEngage encourages participants to remain civically and academically engaged even after they leave the community in which they served.  Students may want to “re-engage” after returning to Duke in some or all of the following ways:

• Attend DukeEngage’s September event “Back at Duke” to connect to participants representing other programs and to a variety of Duke resources that will help you “unpack” your summer experience.

• Consider teaching a student-led House Course that confronts a theme you explored during your DukeEngage summer.

• Envision a research project, honors thesis and/or independent study that relates to your service experience.

• Find ways to keep in touch on a regular basis with your community partner organization and residents with whom you developed strong ties.

• Share your experiences in Duke courses that relate to your DukeEngage service.

• Research thematic, cultural or issue-related Duke courses, including service-learning courses, in which you may want to enroll following your summer of service.

• Write about your experience — in a blog, in a personal journal, in an opinion piece for the Chronicle or through some other medium that enables you to share what the experience meant to you.

• Volunteer in Durham and/or your home community.

• Arrange a formal discussion group involving other students from your group or cohort who could gather to talk about issues that are still being confronted by the community in which you served.

• Explore local service opportunities — for example, projects organized by programs like America Reads/America Counts or the student-led Duke Partnership for Service—that keep you involved with similar service topics or themes.

• Apply for RIPP-Engage funding or DukeEngage seed money that will enable you to further explore and serve with a community of importance to you.

• Schedule time with a mentor or advisor (such as your DukeEngage advisor, your major advisor, a Duke global advisor, Career Center staff, DukeEngage program faculty leaders or independent project mentors) who can help you think about a variety of “What now?” questions.

• Apply to become a DukeEngage peer mentor or to take a leadership role with the DukeEngage Student Advisory Committee.

• Delve deeper into language, culture or regional studies at Duke or on your own.

• Consider both international and domestic study away programs. 

• Research post-grad fellowships/opportunities through the Undergraduate Research Support Office, OUSF and Duke’s Career Center.

• Attend the fall non-profit/governmental career fair.

• Join fellow students, Duke faculty and visiting fellows on one of the many Bass Connections teams that are working on solutions to complex social and scientific problems.  

  • culture shock tool